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Introduction

  • Reinier L. Zielhuis
  • Anne Stijkel
  • Maarten M. Verberk
  • Maartje van de Poel-Bot
Part of the International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health Supplement book series (OCCUPATIONAL)

Abstract

In the last few decades women have entered the work force in ever increasing numbers; consequently, ever more female workers become occupationally exposed to various chemicals. In the United States in 1978 women constituted 41% of the work force, compared with 38% in 1973, although one-third were still in the traditionally female professions (Stellman and Stellman 1981). In other Western countries similar trends exist; the proportion of women employed is particularly high in the USSR.

Keywords

Occupational Exposure Work Force Female Worker Male Worker Female Reproductive System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) (1982) Threshold limit values for chemical substances and physical agents in the work environment with intended changes for 1982. ACGIH, CincinnatiGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Reinier L. Zielhuis
    • 1
  • Anne Stijkel
    • 1
  • Maarten M. Verberk
    • 1
  • Maartje van de Poel-Bot
    • 1
  1. 1.Coronel Laboratorium, Faculteit der GeneeskundeUniversiteit van AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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