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Plasma Levels of Bupivacain under Continuous Thoracic Epidural Anesthesia and Analgesia

  • H. J. Wüst
  • J. Abel
  • F. M. M. Thiessen
  • M. Breulmann
  • R. Schier
  • O. Richter
Part of the Anaesthesiologie und Intensivmedizin Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine book series (A+I, volume 158)

Abstract

Continuous thoracic epidural analgesia is more and more widely used in our department to achieve adequate relief from postoperative pain. This Technique has proved to be of special value following Whipple’s and portacaval shunt operations and liver resections. In some patients, however, liver function and thus the metabolism of the local anesthetics might be impaired [5]. The infusion of a total dose of up to 3 g bupivacaine into the epidural space during the course of 4 days may increase the plasma concentration of the drug to toxic levels, causing central nervous symptoms and cardiodepression. To evaluate the safety margin of continuous infusion techniques, especially in patients with impaired liver function, the plasma levels of bupivacaine were determined in 25 patients.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. J. Wüst
  • J. Abel
  • F. M. M. Thiessen
  • M. Breulmann
  • R. Schier
  • O. Richter

There are no affiliations available

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