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Fertilization

Chapter

Abstract

In angiosperms a reduction of the gametophyte is manifest. After meiosis small gametophytes are formed with a low number of cells on a high level of differentiation. The microgametophyte produces two sperm cells and, in the macrogametophyte, one egg cell is formed.

Keywords

Pollen Tube Pollen Tube Growth Pollen Germination Petunia Hybrida Filiform Apparatus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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