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Investigations on the Cultivation of Insect Cell Lines in Serum-Free Media

  • H. G. Miltenburger
Part of the Proceedings in Life Sciences book series (LIFE SCIENCES)

Abstract

During the last two decades the sophisticated techniques of cultivating mammalian cells in vitro have been increasingly applied to the culturing of invertebrate cells. Up to now more than 130 cell lines from 56 different species of invertebrates (mostly insects) have been established. In 1962 Grace demonstrated that insect cells can be continuously subcultured as cell lines (6). During the years to follow cell lines, particularly from pest insects belonging to the group lepidoptera (butterflies) were established. At present about 50 lepidopteran cell lines are available. Several cell lines have been derived from other insect groups like diptera, coleoptera and hymenoptera. Particular attention has been paid to lepidopteran cells in culture since in vitro replication of lepidopteran pathogenic viruses has been shown to follow a mechanism similar to that for replication in vivo. These viruses are members of the baculovirus group and are natural pathogens of many lepidopteran pest species. The larvae are killed by the virus infection within a few days. On account of species specificity or very limited host range some of these viruses are used as biological insecticides in integrated pest control.

Keywords

Insect Cell Gypsy Moth Insect Cell Line Nuclear Polyhedrosis Virus Insect Cell Culture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. G. Miltenburger
    • 1
  1. 1.Zoologisches Institut der Technischen UniversitätDarmstadtGermany

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