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Growth of Normal Human Cells in Defined Media

  • Richard G. Ham
Part of the Proceedings in Life Sciences book series (LIFE SCIENCES)

Abstract

Until quite recently, the requirements for growth in culture of normal human cells were poorly understood. Good growth of human diploid fibroblasts had been possible for many years, but only with substantial amounts of serum (Hayflick and Moorhead, 1961). Methods had also been developed for certain types of normal human epithelial cells, such as keratinocytes (Rheinwald and Green, 1975) and mammary epithelial cells (Stampfer et al., 1980), but these typically required feeder layers, conditioned media, or special supplements for satisfactory growth. This report reviews recent progress toward a complete understanding of the growth requirements of several different types of normal human cells.

Keywords

Bronchial Epithelial Cell Clonal Growth Growth Requirement Chicken Embryo Fibroblast Human Diploid Fibroblast 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard G. Ham
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental BiologyUniversity of ColoradoBoulderUSA

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