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Effect of a Ca++Channel Blocker on the Cerebral Reflow Phenomenon in the Dog

  • S. D. Gergis
  • M. D. Sokoll
  • S. M. Sarracino
  • N. F. Kassell
Conference paper

Abstract

The no reflow phenomenon after cerebral ischemia has been described by Ames et al. (1968). Though this phenomena was initially thought to be due to capillary endothelial edema, there is evidence now that arterial spasm is involved (Hart and Sokoll 1978). Vasodilators are therefore suggested as Part of the regime of treatment for patients after cerebral vascular accidents (Wilins 1980). One of the effects of Ca++ channel blockers is vasodilation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of one ++ channel blocker (Verapamil) on cerebral blood flow after ischemic injury.

Keywords

Cerebral Blood Flow Cerebral Ischemia Channel Blocker Blood Flow Measurement Ischemic Period 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    Ames A III, Wright RL, Kowada J. (1968) Cerebral ischemia. II: the no reflow phenomenon. Am J Pathol 52:437–453PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Hart MN, Sokoll MD. (1978) Vascular spasm in cat cerebral cortex following ischemia. Stroke 9:52–57PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Steel RGD, Torrie JH. (1960) Principles and procedures of statistics. McGraw-Hill. New York. p. 67Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Wilkins RH. (1980) Attempted prevention or treatment of intracranial arterial spasm: A survey. Neurosurg 6:198–210CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. D. Gergis
    • 1
  • M. D. Sokoll
    • 1
  • S. M. Sarracino
    • 1
  • N. F. Kassell
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anesthesia and Neurosurgery, College of MedicineUniversity of Iowa Hospitals and ClinicsIowa CityUSA

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