The Uniquely Derived Concept as a Basis for Character Compatibility Analyses

  • Walter J. Le Quesne
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 1)

Abstract

A two-state character is defined as uniquely derived if it has only evolved once in the history of a group, without subsequent reversal. Two independent characters cannot both be uniquely derived if all four possible combinations occur; a character-pair matrix is made up showing the incompatibilities found. A coefficient of character-state randomness is based on the ratio of the number of incompatibilities with the expected number if the character-states had been distributed randomly among the taxa.

Five methods of selection of mutually compatible sets of uniquely derived characters are described and their application to derivation of unrooted and rooted trees. The usefulness of changing the original study group of organisms, both by adding extraneous related species and by taking a subset is emphasized. Methods of applying the technique to multistate characters are briefly discussed. A comparison of the unrooted trees obtained by these methods and Wagner tree techniques has been made.

Keywords

Placental Mammal 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Walter J. Le Quesne
    • 1
  1. 1.Chesham, BucksEngland

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