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The Current Status of Uncemented Tantalum and Niobium Femoral Endoprostheses

  • H. PlenkJr.
  • G. Pflüger
  • S. Schider
  • N. Böhler
  • F. Grundschober

Summary

Ingrowth-type femoral endoprostheses constructed of cold-worked tantalum and niobium were implanted without cement in beagle dogs for unilateral total hip replacement. Twenty-one tantalum stems and 6 out of 13 niobium stems were evaluated after observation periods up to 14 months. Four loose tantalum stems and 3 loose niobium stems were discovered. The remaining stable implants were shown to be solidly anchored to the bone by the histologic examination of thin sections. The patterns of attachment were characteristic of uncemented femoral endoprostheses.

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References

  1. Mears DC (1979) Materials and orthopaedic surgery. Williams & Wilkins, Baltimore, pp 115, 123Google Scholar
  2. Pflüger G, Plenk H Jr, Böhler N, Grundsehober F, Schider S (1982) Experimental studies on total kneeand hip-joint endoprostheses made of tantalum. In: Winter GD, Gibbons DF, Plank H Jr (eds) Biomaterials 1980. Advances in biomaterials, vol 3. Wiley, Chichester New York Brisbane Toronto Singapore, pp 161–167Google Scholar
  3. Schider S, Bildstein H (1982) Tantalum and niobium as potential prosthetic materials. In: Winter GD, Gibbons DF, Plenk H Jr (eds) Biomaterials 1980. Advances in biomaterials, vol 3. Wiley, Chichester New York Brisbane Toronto Singapore, pp 13–20Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. PlenkJr.
  • G. Pflüger
  • S. Schider
  • N. Böhler
  • F. Grundschober

There are no affiliations available

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