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Approaches to the Definition of Mediterranean Growth Forms

  • G. Orshan
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 43)

Abstract

Mediterranean-type ecosystems, characterized by evergreen sclerophyllous small trees or shrubs, are fairly similar in their physiognomy. There have been relatively extensive comparisons among mediterranean-type ecosystems of Chile and California from the evolutionary, morphological and physiological points of view during the last two decades. This work, which continues, was summarized by Di Castri and Mooney (1973), Mooney (1977) and Cody and Mooney (1978). The mediterranean-type ecosystems of California have also been compared to those of the Mediterranean Basin and Australia (Naveh 1967; Specht 1968a,b).

Keywords

Plant Community Life Form Growth Form Mediterranean Ecosystem Vegetation Unit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1983

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  • G. Orshan

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