Diagnosis of Mineral Deficiencies Using Plant Tests

  • D. Bouma
Part of the Encyclopedia of Plant Physiology book series (PLANT, volume 15)

Abstract

When agricultural scientists in the last century began to realize that mineral elements in a plant were taken up from the soil in which the plants grow, it was a logical step to suggest that chemical analysis of plants could be used as a means of assessing the nutrient supply of the soil. At the time it also appeared reasonable to suggest, as von Liebig did in the last century in his Law of Restitution (Goodall and Gregory 1947), that plant analysis could be used to determine the quantities of nutrients removed from the soil by a crop and, therefore, the amounts needed to maintain the supplying power of the soil.

Keywords

Zinc Magnesium Maize Chlorophyll Manganese 

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References

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin-Heidelberg 1983

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  • D. Bouma

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