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Improved Results in Treatment of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in Children — Report of the German Cooperative AML Study BFM-78

  • U. Creutzig
  • G. Schellong
  • J. Ritter
  • A. H. Sutor
  • H. Riehm
  • H. J. Langermann
  • A. Jobke
  • H. Kabisch
Conference paper
Part of the Haematology and Blood Transfusion / Hämatologie und Bluttransfusion book series (HAEMATOLOGY, volume 28)

Abstract

Recently the treatment programs for childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have become more effective, not only in achieving a higher percentage of induction responses but also in the improvement of duration of the first remission [7, 9, 12], Because AML in children is rare — about 80 new cases per year are expected in West Germany and West Berlin – it is necessary to cooperate in multicenter trials to gain experience and to establish the value of new therapies.

Keywords

Acute Myeloid Leukemia Acute Myeloid Leukaemia Induction Regimen Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation Remission Group 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • U. Creutzig
  • G. Schellong
  • J. Ritter
  • A. H. Sutor
  • H. Riehm
  • H. J. Langermann
  • A. Jobke
  • H. Kabisch

There are no affiliations available

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