Drug Interactions with Local Anaesthetics

  • G. Sprotte
  • K. H. Weis
Part of the European Academy of Anaesthesiology book series (ANAESTHESIOLOGY, volume 2)

Abstract

Failure of regional anaesthesia usually occurs because of the incorrect positioning of the needle during injection. To date, no satisfactory explanation has been found for the rare failure of spinal anaesthesia. Lund(1) attributes such failure exclusively to faulty injection techniques. Cohen and Knight(2) have observed changes in the pH value of the cerebrospinal fluid which were associated with a simultaneous failure of spinal anaesthesia. Subsequent investigations have been unable to confirm their findings, however.

Keywords

Titration Osteoarthritis Prostaglandin Indomethacin Bupivacaine 

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References

  1. 1.
    Lund PC (1971) Principles and Practice of Spinal Anesthesia. Anatomical Aspects and Cerebrospinal Fluid. The Arachnoid, Springfield, Charles C. Thomas, p 51.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Cohen EN and Knight RT (1947) Hydrogen ion concentration of spinal fluid and its relation to spinal anesthetic failures. Anesthesiology 8; 594.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Lund PC (1971) Principles and Practice of Spinal Anesthesia. Physical and Chemical Considerations. Springfield, Charles Thomas, p 97.Google Scholar
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    Ziel R and Krupp P (1976) Sognificance of the Membrane Stabilising Effect of Nonnarcotic Analgesics. In: Bonica, J.J. and Albe-Fessard, D.: Advances in Pain Research and Therapy, Vol. 1. New York, Raven Press, p 517.Google Scholar
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    Chin JH and Goldstein DB (1977) Drug tolerance in bio-membranes: A spin label study of the effects of ethanol. Science (Washington) 196; 684.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Sprotte
  • K. H. Weis

There are no affiliations available

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