The Search for Principles of Physiological Organization in Vertebrate Circadian Systems

  • M. Menaker
Part of the Proceedings in Life Sciences book series (LIFE SCIENCES)

Abstract

It is only within the last 15 years that a few favorable experimental situations have been identified that have made it possible to study the physiology of circadian systems in some vertebrates (Aschoff 1981). Given the complexity of the systems under study, the long time constants of experimentation, and the relatively small number of scientists engaged in the work, it is not surprising that I must address the search for principles rather than the principles themselves. Insofar as documented principles exist, they are disturbingly vague. However, in discussing them it becomes clear that at least we know where we should be looking further. A few principles, proto-principles and pseudoprinciples are discussed below.

Keywords

Retina Estradiol Melatonin Alan Zucker 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Menaker
    • 1
  1. 1.Science III, Institute of NeuroscienceUniversity of OregonEugeneUSA

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