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Value of Additional Measurements During Exercise Testing: Oxygen Consumption, Blood Pressure, and Cardiac Output

  • J. M. R. Detry
  • P. Mairiaux
  • K. Kandouci
  • P. Mengeot
  • J. Melin
  • M. F. Rousseau

Abstract

Exercise testing is now routinely used for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease and for the prediction of the severity of the coronary lesions: several chapters of the present book are devoted to these aspects and review the value of exertional electrocardiography (ECG), thallium scintigraphy, and radionuclide angiography.

Keywords

Cardiac Output Stroke Volume Angina Pectoris Maximal Exercise Maximal Oxygen Intake 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. M. R. Detry
  • P. Mairiaux
  • K. Kandouci
  • P. Mengeot
  • J. Melin
  • M. F. Rousseau

There are no affiliations available

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