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Organization and Expression of Plastid Genomes

  • H. J. Bohnert
  • E. J. Crouse
  • J. M. Schmitt
Part of the Encyclopedia of Plant Physiology book series (PLANT, volume 14 / B)

Abstract

A green plant contains at least three types of organelles - nucleus, mitochondrion and plastid - which replicate, transcribe and express their genetic information in a coordinated way. The existence of DNA in plastids might have been inferred already from the genetic studies of Baur (1909) and Correns (1909), provided that the DNA-chromosome-gene concept had existed at that time. Evidence that plastids distribute genetic markers in a non-Mendelian mode of inheritance accumulated from the work performed with higher plants (Renner 1936, Rhoades 1946, Michaelis 1955, Schötz 1958, Stubbe 1959, Hagemann 1964, Röbbelen 1966, Von Wettstein 1967, Tilney-Bassett 1970), Chlamydomonas (Sager 1954) and Euglena (Lyman et al. 1961).

Keywords

Chloroplast Genome Plastid Genome Spinach Chloroplast Euglena Gracilis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Abbreviations

DCMU

3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-l,l-dimethylurea

LSU

large subunit protein of RuBPCase

CFI

coupling factor, Fl-particle of ATP-synthetase

trnA, trnI

tRNA gene symbols

atpA, atpB, atpE

gene symbols for alpha, beta, and epsilon subunit proteins of the plastid ATP-synthetase Fl-complex

rbcL

gene symbol for large subunit protein of the ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase

rbcS

gene symbol for small subunit protein of the ribulose-l,5-bisphosphate carboxylase

psbA

gene symbol for thylakoid membrane protein (mnemonic: 32,000 molecular weight protein, photogene)

rrnA, B

rRNA operon(s)

rrs

gene for 16S rRNA

rrl

gene for 23S Rrna

rrf

gene for 5S rRNA

rrg

gene for 4.5S rRNA

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin-Heidelberg 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. J. Bohnert
  • E. J. Crouse
  • J. M. Schmitt

There are no affiliations available

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