Primatology and Sociobiology

Conference paper
Part of the Proceedings in Life Sciences book series (LIFE SCIENCES)

Abstract

Primatology is a rather broad concept encompassing various scientific approaches. Best known among them are, of course, morphology, physiology, ethology, conservationism, biomedicine, biochemistry and evolutionary biology. And strictly speaking primatology also includes studying human primates. In this chapter I will review the relations with and the possible incorporation into such a broadly defined primatology of a recently emerged discipline called sociobiology. Because it is now some 5 years ago that Wilson’s (1975) impressive volume marked sociobiology’s entrance into the scientific — not to say the public — arena, such a discussion may have some use for primatologists by reviewing the topic on the basis of the growing body of literature and the numerous, and often heated, debates that it has triggered during its birth and infancy. Since the most fierce arguments have been about its possible application to human behavior, I will here include some discussion on human primates. For more literature than provided here see Barash (1977), Caplan (1978), Gregory et al. (1978), Parker (1978), Chagnon and Irons (1979), Christen (1979), or Alexander (1980).

Keywords

Beach Malaria Arena Boulder Malaria Parasite 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Wind
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Human GeneticsFree UniversityAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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