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Morphological and Ecological Characters in Sympatric Populations of Macaca in the Dawna Range

  • A. A. Eudey
Part of the Proceedings in Life Sciences book series (LIFE SCIENCES)

Abstract

Within the order Primates many instances of sympatry of congeneric species have been recorded. Most efforts to analyze these occurrences have been influenced by the principles of competitive exclusion (cf. Hardin 1960) or eharacter divergence/character displacement (Darwin 1958, pp 111–125, Brown and Wilson 1956) and, as a consequence, have concentrated on detailing differential utilization of environmental resources by the sympatric populations and/or morphological differences between them. With few exceptions (cf. Sussman 1979), the evolutionary events, although speculative, that may have led to such sympatry or overlap in ranges, are given minimal or no consideration.

Keywords

Competitive Exclusion Ecological Character Sympatric Population Riverine Habitat Competitive Exclusion Principle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. A. Eudey
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of NevadaRenoUSA

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