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Genetics of Reovirus

  • Bernard N. Fields
Chapter
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 91)

Abstract

Genetic studies aimed at a better understanding of aspects of the structure and function of the genome of mammalian reoviruses were initiated in the late 1960s. These began with the isolation and characterization of temperature-sensitive mutants (Fields and Joklik 1969, Ikegami and Gomatos 1968). Much of the early research in this area, performed mainly before 1975, has been described in a recent, detailed review (Cross and Fields 1977).

Keywords

Genome Segment Viral Hemagglutinin dsRNA Segment Reovirus Type Mammalian Reovirus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bernard N. Fields
    • 1
  1. 1.Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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