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Proteases of the Blastocyst and of the Uterus

  • H.-W. Denker

Abstract

The physiological role which certain proteinases seem to play in embryo implantation in the uterus is recently receiving increasing interest. Analytical studies performed in the rabbit, the mouse and the rat have provided evidence that proteinase systems with peculiar properties are not only present at these sites but certain enzymes also show remarkable changes in activity around implantation (Andary 1974; Dabich and Andary 1976;Denker 1969a, 1972, 1974b, 1975, 1976a;Denker and Fritz 1979;Denker and Petzold 1977; Kirchner 1972; Kirchner et al. 1971; Pinsker et al. 1974; Rosenfeld and Joshi 1977; Strickland et al. 1976). From these studies the hypothesis was derived that the action of proteinases may form an essential part of the mechanisms involved in implantation, and has received support from studies in which proteinase inhibitors were administered in vivo (Dabich and Andary 1974; Denker 1977, 1978a,b). Furthermore, evidence was presented suggesting that the physiological regulation of implantation initiation as governed by maternal hormones may in part be mediated by changes in proteinase and/or proteinase inhibitor activity of uterine tissues or the trophoblast.

Keywords

Uterine Tissue Uterine Epithelium Uterine Lumen Uterine Fluid Post Coitum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • H.-W. Denker
    • 1
  1. 1.Abteilung Anatomie der Medizinischen FakultätRheinisch-Westfälische Technische HochschuleAachenGermany

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