Influence of Neurogenic Blockade on the Endocrine Metabolic Response to Surgery

  • H. Kehlet
  • M. R. Brandt
Part of the Anaesthesiologie und Intensivmedizin / Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine book series (A+I, volume 132)

Abstract

In response to various forms of stress the body reacts with some well-defined endocrine-metabolic changes primarily leading to substrate mobilization. The purpose of this stress-response is still not completely elucidated, and one view has been that it is an ancient neurophysiology reflex response [13]. Another release mechanism could be specific metabolic demands by the traumatized tissue [14]. Early experimental studies showed that afferent neurogenic stimuli from the traumatized area to the brain were the main release mechanism for the pituitary-adrenal response to trauma [10]. During recent years we have studied the role of neurogenic stimuli as a release mechanism for the endocrine-metabolic response to elective surgery in man and this paper summarizes our results.

Keywords

Glycerol Lactate Cortisol Alanine Adrenaline 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Kehlet
  • M. R. Brandt

There are no affiliations available

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