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Molecular Effects of Hormone Treatment on Tissue

  • M. Zeroni
  • M. A. Hall
Part of the Encyclopedia of Plant Physiology book series (PLANT, volume 9)

Abstract

Exogenous application of hormones is one of the most common methods in research into the mode of action of such substances. The rationale behind such approaches is based mainly on the idea of replacement of the endogenous, naturally occurring hormone by an exogenous hormone, the level of which may be controlled and its effect monitored. This is fairly easily accomplished in animal systems, where the gland synthesizing a particular hormone can be dissected out and the target tissue monitored after application of the exogenous hormone via the blood stream. This is rarely easy and often impossible to achieve with plant material because in most instances any given hormone may be produced in more than one location within the plant. Furthermore, the same organ or cell which produces the hormone may also be the target.

Keywords

Gibberellic Acid Tracheary Element Aleurone Layer Auxin Treatment Plant Growth Substance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1980

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  • M. Zeroni
  • M. A. Hall

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