Blue Light Regulation of Chloroplast Development in Scenedesmus Mutant C-2A’

  • G. Brinkmann
  • H. Senger
Part of the Proceedings in Life Sciences book series (LIFE SCIENCES)

Abstract

Green algae normally synthesize thylakoid membranes and associated chlorophyll and proteins equally well in both darkness and light. However, the pigment mutant C-2A’ of Scenedesmus obliquus grown heterotrophically in the dark forms only traces of chlorophyll (Senger and Bishop 1971, 1972). The etioplast of the dark-grown cells shows prethylakoid structures and a high content of starch grains (Senger et al. 1974). Illumination causes a transformation of these structures to a fully active chloroplast (Bishop and Senger 1972; Brinkmann and Senger 1978a). This paper describes the behavior of heterotrophic, dark-grown Scenedesmus mutant C-2A’ cells during such illumination and discusses the regulatory effects of light quality and quantity on the development of thylakoid membranes of a photosynthetically active chloroplast. The previously presented scheme (Brinkmann and Senger 1978a, b) will be modified in the light of these new results.

Keywords

Sucrose Starch Phenol Carbohydrate Electrophoresis 

Abbreviations

ALA

5-aminolevulinic acid

CAP

chloramphenicol

CH

cycloheximide

CPI/II

Chlorophyllprotein complex I/II

DCMU

3(3,4 dichlorphenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea

DNP

2,4-dinitro-phenol

KD

kilodalton

PCV

packed-cell volume

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Brinkmann
    • 1
  • H. Senger
    • 1
  1. 1.Fachbereich Biologie - BotanikUniversität MarburgMarburgGermany

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