The Role of Brain Tissue Pressure in Autoregulation of CBF in Areas of Brain Edema

  • A. Marmarou
  • H. Takagi
  • G. Walstra
  • K. Shulman
Conference paper

Abstract

The laboratory model of brain edema produced by cryogenic injury produces a rise in the intracranial pressure and a uniform reduction of cerebral blood flow in the area of the lesion (3). Both these events have been attributed to the compressive effects of the increased tissue volume. The objective of this study was to isolate pressure and volume effects and test the autoregulatory dynamics in the edematous area to help clarify the interaction between local pressures and mechanisms of CBF control.

Keywords

Platinum Neurol 

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References

  1. 1.
    Brock M, Furuse M, Weber R, Hasuo K Deitz H (1975) Brain tissue pressure gradients. In: Lundberg N, Ponten U, Brock M (eds) Intracranial Pressure II. Springer, Berlin Heildelberg New York, p 215Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bruce DA, Vapalahti M, Sehutz H, Langfitt TW (1972) CBF, CMRO2 and intracranial pressure following a local cold injury to the cortex. In: Brock M, Deitz H (eds) Intracranial Pressure. Springer. Berlin Heidelberg New York p 85CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Marmarou A, Shulman K, Shapiro K, Poll W (1976) The time course of brain tissue pressure and local CBF in vasogenic edema. In: Pappius HM, Feindel W (eds). Dynamics of Brain Edema. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New York p 113Google Scholar
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    Reilly PL, Farrar JK, Miller JD (1977) Vascular reactivity in the primate brain after acute cryogenic injury. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiat 40: 1092–1101PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Marmarou
  • H. Takagi
  • G. Walstra
  • K. Shulman

There are no affiliations available

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