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Cocultivation as a Tool for the Detection of Oncoviruses in Childhood Leukemia

  • K. Nooter
  • C. Zurcher
  • C. Coolen
  • P. Bentvelzen
Conference paper
Part of the Haematology and Blood Transfusion / Hämatologie und Bluttransfusion book series (HAEMATOLOGY, volume 23)

Abstract

In our study on the possible role of type-C oncoviruses in human leukemia we applied the technique of cocultivation of human bone marrow cells with an animal indicator cell line. The cocultivation technique proved to be very useful, for instance, for the isolation of endogenous primate viruses (Todaro et al., 1978). When bone marrow of a leukemic child was cocultivated with the rat XC cell line, a type C virus was readily detected which was related to the simian sarcoma-virus (SiSV) (Nooter et al., 1975). The use of the XC cell line has been abandoned by us because of the pronounced cytopathic effect of primate viruses in this line and the danger of activation of the endogenous rat virus.

Keywords

Bovine Leukemia Virus Childhood Leukemia Endpoint Titer Human Bone Marrow Cell Human Lymphoid Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Nooter
    • 1
  • C. Zurcher
    • 2
  • C. Coolen
    • 2
  • P. Bentvelzen
    • 1
  1. 1.Radiobiological InstituteTNORijswijkThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Institute for Experimental GerontologyTNORijswijkThe Netherlands

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