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The Genome of the Influenza Virus

  • Christoph Scholtissek
Chapter
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 80)

Abstract

Burnet and his colleagues (1949) were the first to recognize an unexpectedly high frequency of recombination among different strains of influenza A viruses (for a review of this work see Burnet, 1959). These studies were confirmed and extended by Simpson and Hirst (1961), taking advantage of the plaque technique, which became available for influenza viruses at this time. As a result of their findings, Burnet (1959) and Hirst (1962) suggested that the influenza genome might be segmented. Further evidence for unusual genetic interactions between influenza viruses came from observations in which inactivated viruses were able to restore infectivity after double or multiple infection, a phenomenon that is called multiplicity reactivation (Henle and Liu, 1951; Barry, 1961b; Scholtissek et al., 1962). A further peculiarity of influenza viruses is that they can be inactivated in a series of steps: the capacity to synthesize the various virus proteins is inactivated according to different kinetics after treatment with an ethylene imminoquinone (Scholtissek and Rott, 1964). This indicates that the various influenza genes function independently, as long as RNA transcription and replication is not impaired.

Keywords

Influenza Virus Swine Influenza Virus Influenza Strain Double Infection Influenza Virus Strain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christoph Scholtissek
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für VirologieJustus-Liebig-Universität GießenGießenFederal Republic of Germany

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