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Temperature

  • Joe J. Hanan
  • Winfred D. Holley
  • Kenneth L. Goldsberry
Part of the Advanced Series in Agricultural Sciences book series (AGRICULTURAL, volume 5)

Abstract

It is instructive to read early texts, Laurie and Kiplinger (1948), and Post (1950), and compare the changes and greater detail of crop temperature requirements in ‘recent publications (see Table 4–1). Temperature is an environmental factor which the greenhouse grower can manipulate easily, yet requirements for precision are great. The greenhouse manager is faced with a variety of conflicting requirements which must be carefully thought out and planned to avoid difficulty; yet he must be ever ready to change temperature to offset conditions over which there may be no control. Thus, temperature manipulation fulfills a variety of needs, such as: (1) timing the finished crop to coincide with periods for maximum return (Christmas, Easter, etc.); (2) fitting the crop to market requirements (keeping life, acclimatization, etc.); and (3) overcoming adverse factors such as low light, low CO2, disease, or inadequate fertilization.

Keywords

Greenhouse Heating Unit Heater Greenhouse Temperature Flower Grower Branch Tube 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joe J. Hanan
    • 1
  • Winfred D. Holley
    • 1
  • Kenneth L. Goldsberry
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of HorticultureColorado State UniversityFort CollinsUSA

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