The Pharmacology of Sedative/Hypnotics, Alcohol, and Anesthetics: Sites and Mechanisms of Action

  • Cedric M. Smith
Part of the Handbuch der experimentellen Pharmakologie / Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology book series (HEP, volume 45 / 1)

Abstract

“Dependency,” “habit,” “addiction,” “compulsion,” “custom,” are a few of the many terms denoting the propensity of some human beings to ingest or otherwise self-administer drugs, the major obvious action of which appears to be one of depression of nervous system activity. The taking of such drugs is implicitly associated with the fact that the agents produce a state objectively and subjectively defined as intoxication. All of the drugs discussed below alter nervous system functions and, concomitantly, the feeling state, self-perception, mood, behavior, and “consciousness.”

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