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A New Therapy Regimen for Brain Edema

  • D. M. Long
  • R. Maxwell
  • K. S. Choi

Summary

It has been demonstrated that two agents which curtail cerebrospinal fluid production are remarkably effective in reducing the expected amount of brain edema in a standardized edema model. The combination of these drugs, furosemide and acetazolamide with a potent glucosteroid dexamethasone, is even more effective. All three drugs have an effect upon cerebrospinal fluid production and all three will reduce increased intracranial pressure. It appears that a combination therapy employing dexamethasone in combination with either furosemide or diamox to reduce the amount of edema developing and to hasten its resolution has a rational basis. It appears that these combination therapies may offer the first major change in edema therapy since dexamethasone was introduced as treatment for brain edema in 1959. Clinical trials certainly appear to be warranted.

Keywords

Brain Edema Zinc Chloride Edema Fluid Spinal Fluid Pressure Ergotamine Tartrate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. M. Long
    • 1
  • R. Maxwell
    • 1
  • K. S. Choi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryJohn Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA

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