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Histamine Release

  • A. Goth
  • B. Uvnäs
  • N. Chakravarty
Part of the Handbuch der experimentellen Pharmakologie / Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology book series (HEP, volume 18 / 2)

Abstract

Studies on histamine release have been pursued in numerous experimental models, varying in complexity from cell suspensions to whole animals. A review of the general aspects of this phenomenon would be difficult without limiting it to noncyto-toxic, secretory processes. Histamine release by immunologic or nonimmunologic stimuli is usually noncytotoxic. The response of the histamine-secreting cell to a given stimulus is a function of the presence of specific receptors and a stimulus-secretion coupling mechanism. Application of these assumptions and limitations will exclude the discussion of mast cell disrupting agents and listings of cytotoxic histamine releasers. Much of the information on this subject has been summarized in a number of relatively recent reviews (Goth, 1973; Lichtenstein, 1973; Becker and Henson, 1973; Uvnäs, 1974; Goth and Johnson, 1975; Kaliner and Austen, 1975).

Keywords

Mast Cell Histamine Release Disodium Cromoglycate Acta Physiol Mast Cell Granule 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Goth
  • B. Uvnäs
  • N. Chakravarty

There are no affiliations available

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