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Stability of Tundra Ecosystems in Fennoscandia

Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 17)

Abstract

The vegetation pattern in Fennoscandian tundra areas undisturbed by human interference or violent fluctuations in animal populations remains very constant, by reason of the strong environmental control of the vegetation pattern. Probably nowhere in the world do environmental conditions change more abruptly over short distances than in alpine tundra areas (Dahl, 1975). Microclimatic differences caused by differences in slope, exposure and degree and duration of snow cover in winter are very large; hence within a distance of 20m, mean annual soil temperatures may vary as much as 4° C or about the difference between Oslo and Paris. Drainage conditions and soil fertility can also vary very strongly within short distances. All these variables exert a strong influence on the composition of vegetation, which is strongly adapted to the specific, environmental conditions. Normally environmental conditions do not vary drastically from one year to another compared with environmental differences in neighboring localities. Therefore, as long as topographic conditions, soil properties and climate remain constant, the vegetation pattern also remains constant.

Keywords

Acid Deposition Vegetation Pattern Birch Forest Tundra Ecosystem Subordinate Species 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Dahl

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