Lymphocytic Series

  • Marcel Bessis

Abstract

Our concepts of the origin and function of lymphocytic cells have undergone drastic changes in recent years, thanks to the introduction of new techniques and an enormous number of investigations on the role of lymphocytes in immunology. Older theories which considered the small lymphocytes as terminal cells have been entirely abandoned. It is now well established that most lymphocytes are, on the contrary, in a state of quiescence and have multiple possibilities for further evolution. It is also recognized that the term lymphocyte encompasses a large number of cells with different functions, and possibly even different origins. Notwithstanding the immense quantity of research1, 2, which has taught us a large number of new facts, there remain large tracts of unexplored territory, and many interpretations remain uncertain. We shall, therefore, give only a broad outline of the major questions which are currently under discussion and will emphasize what is useful for the reinterpretation of blood smears.

Keywords

Migration Hepatitis Leukemia Pneumonia Polysaccharide 

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Selected Bibliography

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marcel Bessis
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.School of MedicineParisFrance
  2. 2.Institute for Cell Pathology (INSERM 48)Hospital of BicêtreParisFrance

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