The Relationship between Cortical Electrical Activity, Cerebral Perfusion Pressure, and Cerebral Blood Flow during Increased Intracranial Pressure

  • R. G. Grossman
  • J. W. Turner
  • J. D. Miller
  • J. O. Rowan

Abstract

The cellular mechanisms by which increased intracranial pressure (ICP) impairs cortical function were studied by means of simultaneous recording of electrocortical activity and cerebral blood flow (CBF) during periods of increased intracranial pressure.

Keywords

Dura Phencyclidine 133Xe 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Johnston, I. H., Rowan, J. O., Harper, A. M., and Jennett, W. B.: “Raised intracranial pressure and cerebral blood flow. I. Cisterna magna infusion in primates.” J. Neurology Neurosurgery Psychiatry 35:285–296 (1972).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Miller, J. D., Stanek, A., and Langfitt, T. W.: “Concepts of cerebral perfusion pressure and vascular compression during intracranial hypertension.” In: Progress in Brain Research, Vol. 35, Cerebral Blood Flow. J. S. Meyer and J. P. Schade, eds. Amsterdam: Elsevier 1972), pp. 411–432.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Phillis, J. W., and Ochs, S.: “Occlusive behavior of negative-wave direct cortical response (DCR) and single cells in the cortex.” J. Neurophysiology 34:374–388 (1971).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. G. Grossman
  • J. W. Turner
  • J. D. Miller
  • J. O. Rowan

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations