Dynamics of Water in the Soil-Plant-Atmosphere System: A Model Named Troika

  • J. R. Lambert
  • F. W. T. Penning de Vries
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 4)

Abstract

Water tends to move from the surrounding soil to root surfaces, through the plant and thence into the atmosphere along a gradient of water potential. The several rates are generally transient, and thus attempts to look at the processes from a viewpoint smaller than that of a system are futile. Water uptake rates depend on soil state and parametric variables, such as water potential and conductivity, and on similar plant characteristics. The latter in turn depend on activities throughout the plant previous to the time of rate calculations, including the history of transpiration and water uptake. Rates of movement within and from the plant depend on the environment as well as the physiological conditions of the plant.

Keywords

Permeability Dioxide Hydration Depression Dehydration 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. R. Lambert
  • F. W. T. Penning de Vries

There are no affiliations available

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