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Pool of Staphylococcal Infections in a Hospital

  • H. Reber
Conference paper
Part of the Bayer-Symposium book series (BAYER-SYMP, volume 3)

Abstract

The change of the microbial flora at the site of infection is a problem of ecology. Three conditions must be fulfilled:
  1. 1.

    the presence of a terrain susceptible to be colonized;

     
  2. 2.

    a bacterial vacuum caused by chemotherapy, and

     
  3. 3.

    the availability of a secondary invader (Rebeb).

     

Keywords

Staphylococcus Aureus Rheumatic Fever Septic Lesion Staphylococcal Infection Infected Bypass 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Reber
    • 1
  1. 1.Med. Univ.-KlinikBürgerspitalBaselSwitzerland

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