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Metabolism of the Ovum Between Conception and Nidation

  • R. L. Brinster
Part of the Colloquium der Gesellschaft für Biologische Chemie in 9.–11. April 1970 in Mosbach/Baden book series (MOSBACH, volume 21)

Abstract

During the past ten years there has been a considerable increase in the interest in the metabolism of the early mammalian embryo, which has resulted in a gradual accumulation of information about the biochemistry and physiology of these stages in development. Despite this increase in information, our understanding of the events which occur between ovulation and implantation is rather fragmentary and far from complete. We are well aware of the more obvious events such as fertilization, cleavage, blastocyst formation, and early attachment of the embryo to the uterus, but we know almost nothing of the genetic changes and biochemical processes which underlie these obvious morphological events. At the present time we have the most information about energy metabolism and next most about protein metabolism; outside these two areas very little is known. Consequently, much of the following discussion will deal primarily with energy and protein metabolism and information which relates to these two areas.

Keywords

Mouse Embryo Blastocyst Formation Early Mouse Embryo Preimplantation Mouse Embryo Early Cleavage Stage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1970

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. L. Brinster
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Reproductive Physiology, School of Veterinary MedicineUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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