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Ultrastructure of Pollen Embryogenesis

  • T. L. Reynolds
Part of the Biotechnology in Agriculture and Forestry book series (AGRICULTURE, volume 12)

Abstract

In vitro androgenesis has been induced in a wide range of species (for reviews see Maheshwari et al. 1982; Bajaj 1983; Heberle-Bors 1985; Raghavan 1986). One of the major goals in the study of pollen androgenesis is to determine how pollen grains are induced to enter a new developmental pathway to form embryoids. Since there are numerous ultrastructural changes that occur during pollen transformation, a thorough analysis of these events would aid in attaining this goal. The purpose of this chapter is to review the ultrastructural cytology of pollen embryogenesis to illustrate how this knowledge has been used to gain some insight into this phenomenon. This review will concentrate on Hyoscyamus niger L. (henbane; Solanaceae) and use other systems to illustrate variations.

Keywords

Anther Culture Bicellular Pollen Vegetative Cell Nucleus Large Central Vacuole Pollen Embryogenesis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. L. Reynolds
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyUniversity of North CarolinaCharlotteUSA

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