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Digitalis spp.: In Vitro Production of Haploids

  • P. Pérez-Bermúdez
  • M.-J. Cornejo
  • J. Segura
Part of the Biotechnology in Agriculture and Forestry book series (AGRICULTURE, volume 12)

Abstract

Digitalis, a member of the Scrophulariaceae, is composed of biennial or perennial herbs and occasionally of small shrubs. Several Digitalis species are used therapeutically, as they are a source of cardiac glycosides. The importance and distribution of these species are summarized below, with special attention to D. purpurea, D. lanata and D. obscura. For a detailed review see Thtin et al. (1972), Morton (1977), and Font Quer (1978).

Keywords

Anther Culture Plant Cell Culture Cardiac Glycoside Haploid Plant Cold Pretreatment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Pérez-Bermúdez
  • M.-J. Cornejo
  • J. Segura
    • 1
  1. 1.Departamento de Biologia Vegetal, Facultad de Farmacia,Universitat de ValènciaValenciaSpain

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