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Plaques and Tangles: Where and When?

Conference paper
Part of the Research and Perspectives in Alzheimer’s Disease book series (ALZHEIMER)

Abstract

Alzheimer pathology includes two main aspects (Duyckaerts et al. 1995): the extracellular deposition of ß amyloid (Aß) and the intracellular accumulation of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein. The relationship between these two markers and their link with dementia are still a matter of debate (Selkoe 1991; van de Nes et al. 1994). Tau pathology appears to be more closely associated with dementia than Aß deposition (Berg et al. 1993; McKee et al. 1991; Wilcock and Esiri 1982) but Aß could play the role of a trigger (Hardy 1992) and be the cause of a “cascade,” leading finally to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles and neuropil threads.

Keywords

Neurofibrillary Tangle Senile Plaque Brodmann Area Parahippocampal Gyrus Diffusion Index 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Laboratoire de Neuropathologie R. EscourelleHôpital de La SalpêtrièreParis Cedex 13France

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