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Transducers

  • Igor Grabec
  • Wolfgang Sachse
Part of the Springer Series in Synergetics book series (SSSYN, volume 68)

Abstract

The ability of a living organism to accommodate to a changing environment is an essential element for the existence of life itself. How can a living being achieve this? It must have an ability to sense its environment and to respond. What is sensing and what is responding? If we observe an animal, we quickly recognize that it possesses special organs composed of cells which are selectively sensitive to influences of their environment. We call such cells sensors. The sensors of living beings respond to light, sound, to mechanical stimuli or to a variety of chemicals. There are also other characteristic cells called actuators which respond to stimuli to generate motions. In order to function properly, the sensors and actuators of a living being require a link which is provided by an amazing network of neurons and the brain. This link is an information processing system because it transforms the information of a stimulus into an output response of the system.

Keywords

Input Signal Output Signal Hair Cell Physical Variable Basilar Membrane 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Igor Grabec
    • 1
  • Wolfgang Sachse
    • 2
  1. 1.Faculty of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of LjubljanaLjubljanaSlovenia
  2. 2.Theoretical and Applied MechanicsCornell UniversityIthacaUSA

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