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Regulatory Aspects in the Use of Titanium-based Materials for Medical Applications

  • Karl-Gustav Strid
Chapter
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Part of the Engineering Materials book series (ENG.MAT.)

Abstract

Biomaterials are regulated not as such but as constituents of medical devices. The aim of regulating medical devices is to ensure that only devices for which the safety and effectiveness have been demonstrated are provided to patients.

Keywords

Medical Device Biological Evaluation Regulatory Aspect European Economic Area Surgical Implant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karl-Gustav Strid
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Anatomy & Cell BiologyGöteborgSweden

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