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Operation Modes of Battery Chargers for Electric Vehicles in the Future Smart Grids

  • Vítor Monteiro
  • João C. Ferreira
  • João L. Afonso
Part of the IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology book series (IFIPAICT, volume 423)

Abstract

This paper presents an on-board bidirectional battery charger for Electric Vehicles (EVs), which operates in three different modes: Grid-to-Vehicle (G2V), Vehicle-to-Grid (V2G), and Vehicle-to-Home (V2H). Through these three operation modes, using bidirectional communications based on Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), it will be possible to exchange data between the EV driver and the future smart grids. This collaboration with the smart grids will strengthen the collective awareness systems, contributing to solve and organize issues related with energy resources and power grids. This paper presents the preliminary studies that results from a PhD work related with bidirectional battery chargers for EVs. Thus, in this paper is described the topology of the on board bidirectional battery charger and the control algorithms for the three operation modes. To validate the topology it was developed a laboratory prototype, and were obtained experimental results for the three operation modes.

Keywords

Battery Charger Grid to Vehicle (G2V) Vehicle to Grid (V2G) Vehicle to Home (V2H) Electric Vehicles Smart Grids 

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Copyright information

© IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vítor Monteiro
    • 1
  • João C. Ferreira
    • 1
  • João L. Afonso
    • 1
  1. 1.Centro AlgoritmiUniversity of MinhoGuimarãesPortugal

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