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Hydrothermal Treatment of Municipal Solid Waste for Producing Solid Fuel

  • Kunio YoshikawaEmail author
  • Pandji Prawisudha
Chapter
Part of the Green Chemistry and Sustainable Technology book series (GCST)

Abstract

The usage of municipal solid waste (MSW) is usually hindered by its nonuniformity, high moisture, low energy density, and the occurrence of chlorine in the plastic-impregnated waste. A hydrothermal treatment is developed to convert the MSW into solid fuel by employing a commercial scale system of about 1 ton capacity, applying saturated steam at about 2 MPa for about 60 min holding time. It was shown that the product has better uniformity, higher density, and better drying performance compared to MSW without reducing its heating value. The combustion characteristic of the final product was similar to that of sub-bituminous coal, and capable of reducing the SO2 and NO emissions during co-combustion with coal. Additionally, the product showed that about 80 % of the organic chlorine was converted into inorganic, water-soluble chlorine, and the total chlorine content in the water-washed product was down to 16 %. It was calculated that the required energy for the hydrothermal treatment was 0.8 MJ/kg MSW, lower than conventional RDF production process which needs 1.35 MJ/kg MSW. It can be concluded that the hydrothermal treatment can be employed to convert MSW into a chlorine-free solid fuel suitable for co-combustion with coal.

Keywords

Municipal Solid Waste Solid Fuel Hydrothermal Treatment Hydrothermal Process Chlorine Content 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Environmental Science and TechnologyTokyo Institute of TechnologyYokohamaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical EngineeringBandung Institute of TechnologyBandungIndonesia

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