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Clinical use of the Laser-Speckle-Method for a Non-Contact Detection of skin Circulation in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

  • J. Schmand
  • B. Ruth
  • D. Abendroth
Conference paper

Abstract

This study was carried out to evaluate the possibility of a clinical employment of the Laser-Speckle-Method for non-contact determination of the skin-circulation:
  • In the clinical workaday routine, we find a lot of situations where a simple and non-invasive method for fast, quantitative measurement of the circulation without sideeffects is needed: Not only in terms of diabetic microangiopathy, what we investigated, but also in plastic and reconstructive surgery (e.g. perfusion of free flaps), in transplant surgery (e.g. quality of graft perfusion), in terms of arterial occlusive disease, secondary wound healing and during anesthesia, just to mention a few. Up to now, none of the clinical established methods for blood flow detection is able to fulfill the conditions mentioned above. Either they are indirect measurements only, like thermographia (Abendroth, 1987) or detection of the surface p02 (Kessler 1969), or they are not applicable in patients because of their side-effects, like fluorescent markers for intravital microscopy (Zimmerhackl, 1983) or radioactive microspheres (Buckberg, 1971). Even the Laser-Doppler-Method (Nilsson, 1980) has a severe disadvantage: the probe is attached to the skin and therefore disturbes microcirculation.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Schmand
    • 1
  • B. Ruth
    • 2
  • D. Abendroth
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Surgery, Klinikum GroßhadernLudwig-Maximilians-UniversityMunich 70Deutschland
  2. 2.GSF-Forschungszentrum für Umwelt und GesundheitNeuherbergDeutschland

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