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The Mammary Tumor Virus (MTV)

  • Phyllis B. Blair
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 45)

Abstract

During the early decades of this century, three factors were found to play major roles in the genesis of mammary tumors in mice: the genetic constitution of the mouse, hormonal stimulation, and the milk-transmitted mammary tumor agent or virus (Bittner, 1939b, 1939d, 1942c). The fact that mouse strains with a high incidence of mammary tumors as well as strains with a very low incidence could be developed by inbreeding and selection suggested the importance of the genotype of the mouse. The observation that tumors appeared only in females indicated the role of hormonal stimulation, which was established by experiments involving castration and exogenous hormone administration. Reciprocal crosses between strains revealed the presence of an extrachromosomal maternal influence, which was soon identified as a milk-transmitted virus.

Keywords

Mammary Gland Mammary Tumor Mammary Cancer Test Mouse Mammary Gland Tissue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • Phyllis B. Blair
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Bacteriology and Immunology, and the Cancer Research Genetics LaboratoryUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

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