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Arboviruses, the Arthropod-Borne Animal Viruses

  • Roy W. Chamberlain
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 42)

Abstract

Arboviruses are unique in infecting both vertebrates and blood-sucking arthropods. Acquired from the infected blood of vertebrates, they multiply in the arthropod, become established in the sallvary glands, and are subsequently transmitted to other susceptible vertebrates by bite. In briefest terms, arboviruses are defined as animal viruses transmitted biologically by hematophagous arthropods to vertebrate hosts (Casals, 1966; Andrewes, 1962).

Keywords

Encephalitis Virus Yellow Fever Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Semliki Forest Virus Arthropod Vector 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roy W. Chamberlain
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory Improvement ProgramArbovirus Infections UnitUSA

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