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Inclusion-Type Insect Viruses

  • G. R. Stairs
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 42)

Abstract

The best known insect viruses cause the formation of inclusions in the cells they infect. They were first observed in the mid-nineteenth century and since then have received considerable attention from entomologists and microbiologists. In recent years, several authors have reviewed studies on this group of viruses (Bergold, 1958; Aizawa, 1963; Smith, 1963; Huger, 1963) and the present review will be concerned more specifically with structure and chemistry, the infection process, quantitative virus-host relationships and the natural occurrence of viruses in their host populations. The nuclear-polyhedroses of Lepidoptera and Hymenoptera (Sawflies), the cytoplasmic polyhedroses of Lepidoptera and the granuloses of Lepidoptera are discussed in detail.

Keywords

Inclusion Body Host Population Midgut Epithelium Insect Virus Galleria Mellonella 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. R. Stairs
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Zoology and EntomologyThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA

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