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Depolarising Neuromuscular Blocking Drugs

  • Eleanor Zaimis
  • S. Head
Part of the Handbuch der experimentellen Pharmakologie / Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology book series (HEP, volume 42)

Abstract

Since the publication of the review by Paton and Zaimis on the “Methonium Compounds” (1952), the pharmacology of depolarising neuromuscular blocking drugs has been covered from various vantage points by a number of other authors, including Bovet (1972), Bowman (1964), Bowman and Marshall (1972), Bowman and Webb (1972), Chagas et al. (1972), Cheymol and Bourillet (1972), Foldes (1960), Foldes and Duncalf (1972), Karczmar (1967), Michelson and Zeimal (1973), Paton (1956), Cookson and Paton (1969), Thesleff and Quastel (1965), Vourc’h (1972). Because of this, the present chapter will not aim at the orthodox overall coverage, but will concentrate instead on areas of especial relevance to the actions of these drugs and particularly on certain recent developments.

Keywords

Tibialis Muscle Tibialis Anterior Muscle Neuromuscular Transmission Muscle Temperature Repetitive Firing 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eleanor Zaimis
  • S. Head

There are no affiliations available

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