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Confrontation Scenario Simulation Using Functional Programming Model

  • Lin Tang
  • Minggang Dou
  • Ze Deng
  • Dan Chen
Conference paper
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 402)

Abstract

Simulation is an important approach to the study of scenarios of confrontation among antagonistic groups. It remains a research issue to explore the influence of the crowd size and imbalance between groups’ sizes on the process of confrontation. In this study, a multi-agent simulation system has been developed with functional programming model (FPM). FPM can easily formulate the simultaneous behaviors/actions of individuals. It also provides “communication backbone” for agents’ interactions. A timing system has been designed to drive the simulation procedure. Our simulations focus on whether/how a confrontational scenario may remain stable. Experimental results indicate that with the increment of the overall size of the crowd in confrontation, the possibility of the scenario getting out of control rises. A relatively small scale of crowd is much more controllable.

Keywords

Crowd Simulation Multi-agent System Functional Programming Model Confrontation Scenario 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lin Tang
    • 1
  • Minggang Dou
    • 1
  • Ze Deng
    • 1
  • Dan Chen
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Computer ScienceChina University of GeosciencesWuhanChina

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