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Robots That Can Play with Children: What Makes a Robot Be a Friend

  • Muhammad Attamimi
  • Kasumi Abe
  • Akiko Iwasaki
  • Takayuki Nagai
  • Takayuki Shimotomai
  • Takashi Omori
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8226)

Abstract

In this paper, a playmate robot system, which can play with a child, is proposed. Unlike many therapeutic service robots, our proposed system is implemented as a functionality of the domestic service robot with a high degree of freedom. This implies that the robot can use its body and toys for playing high-level games with children, i.e., beyond therapeutic play, using its physical features. The proposed system currently consists of ten play modules, including a chatbot, card playing, and drawing. To sustain the player’s interest in the system, we also propose an action-selection strategy based on a transition model of the child’s mental state. The robot can estimate the child’s state and select an appropriate action in the course of play. A portion of the proposed algorithms was implemented on a real robot platform, and experiments were carried out to design and evaluate the proposed system.

Keywords

Playmate robots child’s mental modeling and Markov decision process 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Muhammad Attamimi
    • 1
  • Kasumi Abe
    • 1
  • Akiko Iwasaki
    • 2
  • Takayuki Nagai
    • 1
  • Takayuki Shimotomai
    • 2
  • Takashi Omori
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical Engineering and Intelligent SystemsThe University of Electro-CommunicationsChofu-shiJapan
  2. 2.Department of Electrical EngineeringTamagawa UniversityMachida-shiJapan

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