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A Model Integration Framework for Assessing Integrated Landscape Management Strategies

  • Jared M. Abodeely
  • David J. Muth
  • Joshua B. Koch
  • Kenneth M. Bryden
Part of the IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology book series (IFIPAICT, volume 413)

Abstract

Nitrogen application is a standard practice for maximizing productivity of an agronomic system. The challenge is that many commercial scale agricultural systems are inefficient in utilizing the nitrogen that is applied. Therefore, understanding the impact of land management practices on nitrogen use inefficiencies within the agroecosystem is critical. This paper presents an integrated model that quantifies the impact of various land management practices on specific agroecosystem units. This integrated model is composed of the Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS), the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation, Version 2 (RUSLE2), the Soil Condition Index (SCI), and the daily CENTURY model, DAYCENT. The integrated model was used to determine the impact of land management strategies on greenhouse gas emissions and nitrate leaching in a 60.5 ha field in Webster County, Iowa, USA. It was found that nitrogen use efficiency can vary significantly across a field and that integrated land management strategies can reduce overall nitrogen losses.

Keywords

integrated model soil organic carbon greenhouse gas emissions nitrate leaching 

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Copyright information

© IFIP International Federation for Information Processing 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jared M. Abodeely
    • 1
  • David J. Muth
    • 1
  • Joshua B. Koch
    • 1
  • Kenneth M. Bryden
    • 2
  1. 1.Idaho National LaboratoryIdaho FallsUSA
  2. 2.Iowa State UniversityAmesUSA

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